Archive | May 2012

Patient Reported Outcomes and Mobile Solutions

As stated in some of my previous posts, I have been working in the Life Sciences industry for over 8 years now. That amounts to a little bit over half my career till date. It has been a good journey with appreciation towards the greater good that this industry does in making people’s lives better. I agree that there is an image problem due to multiple incidents that compromised patients’ safety for profits or other trade-offs. However, all in all I personally think that there is much more good done than harm.

One thing that Life Sciences industry is not is “being technologically savvy”. Even this statement, if applied with in an organization, the degree of applicability changes from one business unit to the other. More than that, it has to be stated that the units that are “more regulated” are much behind in new technology adoption. The units that I have been working with the most is Research & Development (R&D). Even within this unit, the Research Teams, specifically Drug Discovery teams are more open to adopting new and advanced technology compared to the Drug Development teams.

As part of my day job, one of my goals is to continuously monitor new technology trends, specifically within the Life Sciences realm and help our teams develop new solutions and services. Identifying the solutions to be developed is not an easy job considering the economic constraints under which most companies are working in this “New Economy”. Luckily for me, another goal of my job is to find the right partners who would help us develop these new solutions and services so we can go to market faster.

One such partnerships is with a company that developed a Mobile Solution to enable Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO). I did a joint Webinar with them today titled “Maximizing Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) compliance in Clinical Trials – Leveraging Mobile Solutions“. While trying to put together a presentation that highlight the trends in Mobility adoption in general and adoption in Life Sciences and specifically Clinical Trials, I found out some surprising facts that the Mobile industry will be growing at a CAGR of 15.6% for the next 5 years (IDC Press Release).Also, according to another IDC report, Smart Phones will out sell the Netbooks, Desktops, Laptops and such combined in the next couple of years.

Patient Reported Outcomes (PRO) is all about getting information directly from the patients, without any interpretation  by specialists. In fact, FDA defines this as “A measurement based on a report that comes directly from the patient (i.e., study subject) about the status of a patient’s health condition without amendment or interpretation of the patient’s response by a clinician or anyone else. A PRO can be measured by self-report or by interview provided that the interviewer records only the patient’s response“. In my opinion, it looks obvious that leveraging the Mobile devices to run PRO trials improves the overall quality of data as well as the response time, not to mention the compliance to a large extent. The key is the coverage of last mile, i.e. enabling the patients to be reminded of any delays in submission of assessments. This will also open up a more personal service channel that can be leveraged to build a closer relationship with the patients.

As with adoption of many other disruptive technologies like Social Media, Cloud Computing etc. the regulatory compliance questions need to be addressed for any solutions developed to be used on Mobile devices. You can refer to my previous post titled “iPads, iPhones, Androids, Windows Mobile Phones, Life Sciences and Compliance” on what are the regulatory compliance requirements (specifically, guidance by FDA) to be considered in this context. The key is to ensure that the patient data collected is secure and the solution works in situations where the patient does not have connectivity. Also, the overall cost of the trial would come down considerably if the protocol permits ‘Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)” model for patients participating in the trial. Of course, this depends on the nature of the protocol and the trial design.

All in all, with the phenomenal up tick in Smart Phone sales, more so in ‘Pharmerging” markets like India and China which are also becoming the “Hubs” of future growth for Life Sciences companies, it is essential that Mobile solutions be developed and used to cover the last mile i.e. for the user touch points like Physicians, Patients and Pharmacies.

As always, your feedback and comments are welcome. I also encourage you to share Pros and Cons of the adoption based on your practical experience. I will be even more interested in any technological challenges you may have come across in the adoption process.

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iPads, iPhones, Androids, Windows Mobile Phones, Life Sciences and Compliance

Apple has sold millions of iPads in the past 18 months. The adoption of the device in the market is phenomenal. This trend is reflected in Life Sciences & Healthcare industry as well. A mobile Health News article (2012: About 62 percent of physicians use tablets) puts the adoption of tablets by the physicians at 62%. Another report by IDC puts the Smart Devices sales exceeding the combined sales of laptops and desktops. All these trends are indicative of the rate of adoption of mobile and smart devices by the population in general. The healthcare and life sciences industries are no exception to this.

While the adoption is growing in general, the challenges and bottlenecks are numerous for adoption of the devices in an Enterprise/Business setting. To make this even more complex, consider using the tablets and smart phones in a validated environment to capture and manage personal health information of patients.

Some key questions to be asked while considering adoption of Mobile devices in a validated environment are:

  • Will the device and application be considered a Mobile Medical Device?
  • If so, what should we do to validate the application?
  • What are the regulatory requirements and guidance from the agencies?
  • Should we consider a native application vs. a web based application?
  • If so, how does the validation activities and artifacts differ?
  • Would the data be stored on the device or would it be transferred to the server as soon as it is captured?
  • Should we make it available offline to enable usage without internet connectivity?
  • What are the synchronization challenges?
  • How do we handle identity management?
  • How do we ensure data security?

While some of these questions are applicable to any enterprise mobile application, they are even more important to consider if the Mobile device is slated to be used in a regulated environment. For customers in the US, one key document to be considered as input, to answer some of the questions, is FDA’s DRAFT Guidance for Mobile Medical Applications.

mHIMSS Policy & Regulatory Implications Workgroup has provided a very good summary of how the guidance should be interpreted with respect to Mobile Medical Applications. You can read the summary here (needs registration).

FDA also provides more useful information on Mobile Medical Applications here.

I look forward to comments and insights into any specific experiences that you might have had with respect to developing Enterprise Mobile Applications in a regulated environment. These applications may or may not be companion applications to devices, but may fall under the MMA purview as defined in the guidance.

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